A vast wealth gap, driven by segregation, redlining, evictions and exclusion, separates black and white America

By Trymaine Lee
August 14, 2019

(article from NY Times)  Elmore Bolling, whose brothers called him Buddy, was a kind of one-man economy in Lowndesboro, Ala. He leased a plantation, where he had a general store with a gas station out front and a catering business; he grew cotton, corn and sugar cane. He also owned a small fleet of trucks that ran livestock and made deliveries between Lowndesboro and Montgomery. At his peak, Bolling employed as many as 40 people, all of them black like him.

One December day in 1947, a group of white men showed up along a stretch of Highway 80 just yards from Bolling’s home and store, where he lived with his wife, Bertha Mae, and their seven young children. The men confronted him on a section of road he had helped lay and shot him seven times — six times with a pistol and once with a shotgun blast to the back. His family rushed from the store to find him lying dead in a ditch.

The shooters didn’t even cover their faces; they didn’t need to. Everyone knew who had done it and why. “He was too successful to be a Negro,” someone who knew Bolling told a newspaper at the time. When Bolling was killed, his family estimates he had as much as $40,000 in the bank and more than $5,000 in assets, about $500,000 in today’s dollars. But within months of his murder nearly all of it would be gone. White creditors and people posing as creditors took the money the family got from the sale of their trucks and cattle. They even staked claims on what was left of the family’s savings. The jobs that he provided were gone, too. Almost overnight the Bollings went from prosperity to poverty. Bertha Mae found work at a dry cleaner. The older children dropped out of school to help support the family. Within two years, the Bollings fled Lowndes County, fearing for their lives.

Read full, original article

Leave a Comment

Membership Overview

The ABCLT is a membership-based nonprofit that is controlled by its members. All ABCLT homeowners are members, and other people in the community may also join. All general members have a say in the direction of the ABCLT through voting at the annual membership meeting.

As a general member, you will:

  • Help create and maintain housing that will remain permanently affordable.
  • Participate in meetings of the Membership. 
  • Cast 1 vote on matters properly put before the Membership.
  • Nominate and participate in the election of the Board of Directors.
  • Serve on the Board or committees, if chosen.
  • Receive notices and minutes of Membership Meetings and Annual Reports.
  • You are invited to attend trainings and events.

As a supporting member, you will:

  • Help create and maintain housing that will remain permanently affordable. 
  • Participate in meetings of the Membership. 
  • Serve on the Board or committees, if chosen.
  • Receive notices and minutes of Membership Meetings and Annual Reports.
  • You are invited to attend trainings and events.

The annual membership fee is $25/year or 2 hours of sweat equity.

To become a member, please complete online the application form on this page or you can download the PDF version and mail it in with your $25 membership fee.