Asheville-Buncombe Community Land Trust

African Americans Have Lost Untold Acres of Land Over the Last Century

By Leah Douglas
(original article published in The Nation)

Driving the long, flat roads of Hilton Head Island is hypnotic. One bike-rental shop blends into another; countless villa-style office complexes advertise real-estate agents and banks. Tourists meander to their cars wearing all white, carrying brightly colored smoothies. Rows of palm trees wave slowly over the crawling traffic. A waterfront hotel looms on the horizon.

Along Allen Road, though, an older version of Hilton Head is preserved. The short street bisects a 38-acre plot and travels past some 23 trailers that house members of the Allen family. Tall oak and pine trees block the sun from flowering shrubs in the sandy soil. The noise from passing cars is drowned out by bird chatter and an occasional shout from one family member to another.

Matthew Allen, now in his 70s, grew up visiting this family land where his father and grandfather grew up. “When [my father] was coming up,” he recalls, “they used to…go down to the water to fish. They used to hunt. [They] used to farm the land, used to grow okra, corn, sweet potatoes. They took full advantage of the land.”

It was Dennis Allen, Matthew’s great-grandfather, who purchased the land on Hilton Head. The son of slaves, Dennis Allen bought his first parcel of nearly 20 acres in 1897, at a time when African Americans were purchasing land across the country. Today, the Allen family owns the largest undeveloped lot on Hilton Head.

But as the land enters its 120th year in the family, the Allens are struggling to hold on to it. Because of ambiguities surrounding the land’s title, there is no primary owner of the property; all of the heirs of the original owners—and there are more than 100 known heirs—are legally co-owners. As such, the land is classified as “heirs’ property,” a designation that makes it vulnerable to being sold without the family’s full consent. As the Allens attempt to overcome a stacked legal system—exacerbated by corrupt lawyers and predatory developers—they are at the center of a decades-long fight to retain black-owned land across the South.  Read full article

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Membership Overview

The ABCLT is a membership-based nonprofit that is controlled by its members. All ABCLT homeowners are members, and other people in the community may also join. All general members have a say in the direction of the ABCLT through voting at the annual membership meeting.

As a general member, you will:

  • Help create and maintain housing that will remain permanently affordable.
  • Participate in meetings of the Membership. 
  • Cast 1 vote on matters properly put before the Membership.
  • Nominate and participate in the election of the Board of Directors.
  • Serve on the Board or committees, if chosen.
  • Receive notices and minutes of Membership Meetings and Annual Reports.
  • You are invited to attend trainings and events.

As a supporting member, you will:

  • Help create and maintain housing that will remain permanently affordable. 
  • Participate in meetings of the Membership. 
  • Serve on the Board or committees, if chosen.
  • Receive notices and minutes of Membership Meetings and Annual Reports.
  • You are invited to attend trainings and events.

The annual membership fee is $25/year or 2 hours of sweat equity.

To become a member, please complete online the application form on this page or you can download the PDF version and mail it in with your $25 membership fee.